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A fresh look on semantic priming effects

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thesis
posted on 28.03.2022, 21:36 by Bianca de Wit
The research presented in this thesis examined the assumption of automaticity of semantic priming effects, through the manipulation of the proportion of related prime-target pairs (relatednesss proportion, RP), prime visibility (masked vs. unmasked), and type of task (lexical decision vs. semantic categorization). In addition to the analysis of mean RT, the effect of these three manipulations on the RT distribution was also examined. Responses to words (targets) are faster when they are preceded by a word (the prime) related in meaning compared to when the preceding word is semantically unrelated (e.g., RT for hawk-EAGLE < table-EAGLE). This semantic priming effect is widely believed to be automatic when the time between the onset of the prime and target is short, generally less than 250 ms, and is generally explained in terms of automatic spreading activation. The research presented in this thesis examined the assumption of automaticity of semantic priming effects, through the manipulation of the proportion of related prime-target pairs (relatedness proportion, RP), prime visibility (masked vs. unmasked), and type of task (lexical decision vs. semantic categorization). In addition to the analysis of mean RT, the effect of these three manipulations on the RT distribution was also examined. Contrary to the assumption that semantic priming at a short SOA is automatic, all three manipulations impacted on the size of the semantic priming effect and produced different RT distribution patterns. These findings are used to reconsider the notion of automatic spreading activation in explaining semantic priming effects at short SOAs. An alternative view in which semantic priming effects are explained in terms of task-­‐dependent processes is proposed.

History

Table of Contents

Chapter 1. Introduction -- Chapter 2. Relatedness proportion effects in semantic categorization : reconsidering the automatic spreading activation process -- Chapter 3. An RT distribution analysis of relatedness proprtion effects in lexical decision and semantic categorization reveals different mechanisms -- Chapter 4. The masked semantic priming effect is task-dependent : reconsidering the automatic spreading activation process -- Chapter 5. General discussion.

Notes

Includes bibliographical references Thesis by publication.

Awarding Institution

Macquarie University

Degree Type

Thesis PhD

Degree

PhD, Macquarie University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Cognitive Science, ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders

Department, Centre or School

Department of Cognitive Science

Year of Award

2014

Principal Supervisor

Sachiko Kinoshita

Rights

Copyright Bianca de Wit 2014. Copyright disclaimer: http://mq.edu.au/library/copyright

Language

English

Extent

1 online resource (ix, 234 pages) graphs, tables

Former Identifiers

mq:71607 http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/1276182