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An investigation of cryptomarkets: assessing the online drugs trade from the perspectives of Australian health and law enforcement agencies

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posted on 28.03.2022, 15:07 by Romal Nasseri
The development of cryptomarkets is a new criminological phenomenon. Cryptomarkets are defined as a platform that operates on an encrypted part of the Internet and enables its users to anonymously communicate and conduct illicit transactions. This research analyses cryptomarkets through current Australian drug policy. The findings of this research reveal that different organisations such as law enforcement agencies and the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare have different perspectives and priorities when exploring the operations of cryptomarkets. These agencies often have contradictory views when analysing drug-related issues through current Australian drug policy, as they have different agendas on how those issues should be addressed. From the perspective of law enforcement agencies, it is necessary to disrupt the infrastructure of cryptomarkets and prevent people from conducting illicit transactions. However, from the perspective of the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, disrupting cryptomarkets would have negative consequences for the Australian Government and Australian communities. In conclusion, this research argues that although cryptomarkets are a transformative platform that enables individuals to conduct illicit transactions, they should not be disrupted because they offer a less violent alternative to conventional drug distribution networks.

History

Table of Contents

Chapter 1. Introduction -- Chapter 2. A literature survey of cryptomarkets -- Chapter 3. Methodology -- Chapter 4. Analysis of cryptomarkets through the realm of discourse analysis -- Chapter 5. Analysis of cryptomarkets -- Chapter 6. Targeting cryptomarkets -- Chapter 7. Unintended side effects of targeting cryptomarkets -- Chapter 8. Conclusions and future directions.

Notes

Bibliography: leaves 79-97 Theoretical thesis.

Awarding Institution

Macquarie University

Degree Type

Thesis MRes

Degree

MRes, Macquarie University, Faculty of Arts, Department of Policing, Intelligence and Counter Terrorism

Department, Centre or School

Department of Policing, Intelligence and Counter-Terrorism

Year of Award

2015

Principal Supervisor

James Martin

Rights

Copyright Romal Nasseri 2014. Copyright disclaimer: http://www.copyright.mq.edu.au

Language

English

Jurisdiction

Australia

Extent

1 online resource (v, 97 leaves)

Former Identifiers

mq:42116 http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/1050630