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Animal husbandry during the Old and Middle Kingdoms in Ancient Egypt: a thesis in two volumes

thesis
posted on 28.03.2022, 01:52 authored by Paul Leonard Jones
The most important development in the history of civilization was the shift from the traditional "Hunter-Gatherer" lifestyle to one of ordered settlement and the domestication of plant and animal species. One of the parameters that can be used to test the maturity of a civilisation is the relationship that exists between the people and the domesticated animals that they maintain, and their importance to that society. This dissertation explores these animal husbandry practices and their relevance in the daily life of the Egyptians of the Old and Middle Kingdoms and their modern day parallels, of which there are many. Such a study is paramount in understanding how the ancient Egyptians ministered to their herds and developed their unique understanding of farmed animal behaviour. By an examination of scenes of daily life taken from chapel and tomb wall art as they relate to animal husbandry practices from the Old and Middle Kingdoms of ancient Egypt this thesis attempts to compare and contrast these illustrated practices with "modern" day examples, where applicable. In many cases, this research has indicated that nothing has changed over the period of 5,000 years in many parts of this world, thus emphasising that the ancient Egyptians were highly advanced and skilled in their understanding of those animals that were the focus of their husbandry practices. These practices are the basis of many activities that are still in vogue in parts of the developed world -- abstract.

History

Table of Contents

Volume 1: Introduction -- Chapter 1. The origins of Egyptian cattle in the Old and Middle Kingdoms -- Chapter 2. The size of cattle herds in the Old and Middle Kingdoms -- Chapter 3. Large cattle procreation -- Chapter 4. Large cattle milking scenes -- Chapter 5. Large cattle fording a stream or wet land -- Chapter 6. Hand feeding/fattening and treatment of large cattle -- Chapter 7. Scenes of fighting bulls -- Chapter 8. Tethering and restraining methods -- Chapter 9. Miscellaneous scenes of large cattle -- Chapter 10. Utilisation of large cattle -- Chapter 11. Pigs -- Chapter 12. Sheep -- Chapter 13. Goats -- Chapter 14. Donkeys -- Chapter 15. Desert ungulates -- Chapter 16. Hyenas -- Conclusions -- Tomb references -- Bibliography -- Appendices | Volume 2. Illustrations and figures -- Chapter 1. The origins of Egyptian cattle in the Old and Middle Kingdoms -- Chapter 2. The size of cattle herds in the Old and Middle Kingdoms -- Chapter 3. Large cattle procreation -- Chapter 4. Large cattle milking scenes -- Chapter 5. Large cattle fording a stream or wet land -- Chapter 6. Hand feeding/fattening and treatment of large cattle -- Chapter 7. Scenes of fighting bulls -- Chapter 8. Tethering and restraining methods -- Chapter 9. Miscellaneous scenes of large cattle -- Chapter 10. Utilisation of large cattle -- Chapter 11. Pigs -- Chapter 12. Sheep -- Chapter 13. Goats -- Chapter 14. Donkeys -- Chapter 15. Desert ungulates -- Chapter 16. Hyenas.

Notes

Theoretical thesis. Bibliography: pages 354-383

Awarding Institution

Macquarie University

Degree Type

Thesis PhD

Degree

PhD, Macquarie University, Faculty of Arts, Department of Ancient History

Department, Centre or School

Department of Ancient History

Year of Award

2018

Principal Supervisor

Naguib Kanawati

Additional Supervisor 1

Linda Evans

Rights

Copyright Paul Leonard Jones 2018. Copyright disclaimer: http://mq.edu.au/library/copyright

Language

English

Extent

1 online resource (two volumes): illustrations, some colour

Former Identifiers

mq:71725 http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/1277455