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Continuity in adaptation: a history of Rapanui music

thesis
posted on 28.03.2022, 19:32 by Daniell E. Bendrups
This thesis presents a history of Rapanui music, and aims to test the hypothesis that traditionalRapanui musical practices have influenced and are manifested in contemporary performances,despite widely held perceptions of cultural loss. The adaptation of introduced musicalinfluences is presented as a continual process by which Rapanui musicians negotiate theirunderstanding of music and the place of music in their society and culture. The emphasis onadaptation provides a frame of reference that circumvents such culturally loaded terms asacculturation, instead allowing for a framework in which perceived ancient and modemmusical practices are viewed side by side and in historical relation to each other. The ethnographic research method for this study included lengthy periods of fieldwork. participant-observation, interviews with Rapanui musicians, and case studies of particular Rapanui songs and ensembles. Most of the fieldwork occurred on Rapanui, but other locations (particularly in Chile) were included during the research process. The theoretical literature pertaining to the field of ethnomusicology has provided the basis upon which the research findings are presented, though resources from adjunct ethnographic fields of research have also been consulted. A further area of theoretical enquiry concerns the social responsibility of the researcher, and reciprocity is presented as an essential component of the research method.

History

Table of Contents

Introduction -- History, theory and method -- Literature survey -- Traditional Rapanui music -- The consolidation of Rapanui popular music -- Interactions, intersections and cultural reconstruction -- Conclusion.

Notes

Bibliography: pages 356-372 Typescript.

Awarding Institution

Macquarie University

Degree Type

Thesis PhD

Degree

PhD, Macquarie University, Division of Humanities, Department of Contemporary Music Studies

Department, Centre or School

Department of Contemporary Music Studies

Year of Award

2005

Principal Supervisor

Phil Hayward

Additional Supervisor 1

Crowdy Denis

Rights

Copyright Daniell E. Bendrups 2005. Copyright disclaimer: http://mq.edu.au/library/copyright Complete version suppressed due to copyright restrictions. However, on receipt of a Document Supply Request, placed with Macquarie University Library by another library, we will consider supplying a copy of this thesis. For more information on Macquarie University's Document Supply, please contact lib.ill@mq.edu.au

Language

English

Jurisdiction

Easter Island

Extent

1 online resource (xiv, 405 pages, bound) illustrations, music

Former Identifiers

mq:72346 http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/1283927

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