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Fabrication, characterisation and modification of a carbon film microelectrode to selectively monitor dopamine in vivo

thesis
posted on 28.03.2022, 16:29 authored by Michael McNally
In this thesis a procedure is presented for the fabrication of a microelectrode to monitor the neurotransmitter dopamine in vivo. The microelectrodes are fabricated by in situ pyrolysis of acetylene under a nitrogen blanket onto a quartz capillary. The carbon film was then anodically oxidised in the presence of 2,4-dinitroaniline. These microelectrodes are stable, provide the physical strength to penetrate brain tissue, have a low capacitance, are resistant to fouling in vivo and selectively suppress the endogenous ascorbic acid which oxidises at the same potential as dopamine. With such properties the carbon film microelectrode appears ideally suited for fast scanning cyclic voltammetric studies of cationic neurotransmitters such as dopamine in vivo.

History

Alternative Title

Carbon film microelectrodes.

Table of Contents

Microelectrode voltammetry -- Experimental -- Microelectrode fabrication -- Characterisation of the carbon film surface: Surface stability - X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy - Raman spectroscopy - Capacitance - Edge plane concentration - Potential window - Surface concentration of alkenes and alkynes - Outer sphere electron transfer using hexaamineruthenium (III) chloride - Reduction of potassium hexacyanoferrate (III) - Anodic oxidation: diol to dione; dopamine and ascorbic acid - Surface oxidation - Ferrocene in a non aqueous solvent -- Selectivity: Formation of carboxylic acid groups on a carbon film surface by ferrous II sulfate complex oxidation - Ethanol modified carbon film surface - Modification of carbon film microelectrode surface using aromatic amines - Modification of carbon film surfaces to form a dual functional ascorbic acid barrier -- In vivo anti fouling properties of surface modified carbon film microelectrodes -- Conclusion.

Notes

Typescript. Includes bibliographical references

Degree Type

Thesis PhD

Degree

Thesis (PhD), Macquarie University (Division of Environmental & Life Sciences, Dept. of Chemistry & Biomolecular Sciences)

Department, Centre or School

Department of Chemistry and Biomolecular Sciences

Year of Award

2005

Rights

Copyright disclaimer: http://www.copyright.mq.edu.au Copyright Michael McNally 2005.

Language

English

Extent

xxviii, 323 p. ill

Former Identifiers

mq:1906 http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/16067