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Gender and reading: are there really more boys than girls who struggle with reading?

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posted on 28.03.2022, 14:02 authored by Lisa Margaret Limbrick
"It is commonly thought that more boys than girls are identified as having a reading disability, but the degree to which there might be more boys remains controversial. The purpose of this research was to examine the major themes and issues relating to the prevalence of boys identified as having a reading disability, and determine whether there really are more boys identified when these issues are addressed... This research examined whether boys and girls differ across a range of reading and related skills, and whether differences were evident in the early school years. The issue of whether boys require different forms of reading remediation was also examined. It was found that there are more boys than girls who are poor readers, but gender ratios are not as high as previously thought... It was concluded that gender is not a strong or consistent predictor of reading ability, and that boys do not require different remedial reading instruction to girls." -- synopsis.

History

Table of Contents

ch. 1 Introduction -- ch. 2 Methodological factors affecting reported gender ratios for reading disability -- ch. 3 Why do more boys than girls have a reading disability?: A review of the evidence -- ch. 4 Do more boys than girls have reading problems? -- ch. 5 Estimating gender ratios of poor readers using large-scale assessments -- ch. 6 Gender differences in oral reading fluency: are there implications for identifying low-progress readers? -- ch. 7 Reading and related skills in the early school years: are boys really more likely to struggle? -- ch. 8 Do boys need different remedial reading instruction from girls? -- ch. 9 Conclusion.

Notes

"May 2012". Thesis by publication. Submitted in (partial) fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, Macquarie University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Institute of Early Childhood, 2012. Typescript. Includes bibliographical references (pages 300-303)

Awarding Institution

Macquarie University

Degree Type

Thesis PhD

Degree

PhD, Macquarie University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Institute of Early Childhood

Department, Centre or School

Institute of Early Childhood

Year of Award

2012

Principal Supervisor

Kevin Wheldall

Additional Supervisor 1

Alison Madelaine

Language

English

Extent

335 pages, bound

Former Identifiers

mq:37409 http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/337616 1977621