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Monitoring post-fire vegetation recovery using earth observation data in the Blue Mountains

thesis
posted on 2024-03-20, 04:08 authored by David Michael Vann

There is a significant global trend of increasing bushfire frequency and intensity. Understanding the potential impact that this could have on vegetation resilience and recovery is particularly important for high-risk areas. Earth observation data has been used extensively to monitor bushfire impacts on vegetation and subsequent recovery. Optical data (e.g., Sentinel-2) and relevant derived vegetation indices (Normalised Burn Ratio, Normalised Difference Red Edge Index, Normalised Difference Vegetation Index) are extremely useful and accurate when exploring these impacts. Newer earth observation data such as synthetic aperture radar (e.g., Sentinel-1) data and the derived radar vegetation indices and radiometric ECOsystem Spaceborne Thermal Radiometer Experiment on Space Station data could be helpful in providing a fuller picture of vegetation biochemical and biophysical condition. However, currently there is very little research utilising these multi-sensor datasets to track bushfire changes to ecosystems. This study explores vegetation recovery in the Blue Mountains following the ‘Black Summer’ fires (2019/2020). Earth observation time-series data from pre- and post-fire display distinct differences and correlation in recovery measures based on vegetation type and fire severity. There were also notable correlations between optical and radar/thermal earth observation data indicating promising potential use in understanding post-fire vegetation recovery patterns more comprehensively.

History

Table of Contents

Introduction -- Methods -- Results -- Discussion -- Conclusion -- References -- Supplementary materials

Awarding Institution

Macquarie University

Degree Type

Thesis MRes

Degree

Master of Research

Department, Centre or School

School of Natural Sciences

Year of Award

2023

Principal Supervisor

Hsing-Chung Chang

Additional Supervisor 1

Kirstie Fryirs

Rights

Copyright: The Author Copyright disclaimer: https://www.mq.edu.au/copyright-disclaimer

Language

English

Jurisdiction

Australia New South Wales

Extent

66 pages

Former Identifiers

AMIS ID: 266370

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