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The effects of hearing loss on preferences for shared decision making in residential aged care: a mixed methods approach.

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thesis
posted on 28.03.2022, 00:59 by Kristiana Ludlow
Hearing loss is associated with communication breakdown in residential aged care. A review of the literature found that the effects of hearing loss on residents’ preferences for shared decision making remain unknown. The aim of the thesis is to assess how hearing loss affects residents’ preferences for receiving information, and making decisions, in terms of their medical and everyday care. An exploratory mixed methods study was conducted, involving interviews and surveys, with 26 residents. Interviews covered five parts: demographic details; self-perceived hearing loss; and, preferences for receiving information and decision making about medical and everyday care. Statistical analysis, thematic analysis using the Framework Method, and inductive content analysis, were employed to analyse data. Participants demonstrated strong preferences for receiving information and involvement in decision making, in both medical and everyday contexts. Despite strong preferences for receiving information, some participants, including three with hearing loss, expressed dissatisfaction with the communication they received. Participants’ with hearing loss reinforced the importance of family involvement in decision making processes. The findings offer direction for future research by emphasising the need to better understand the communication strategies employed by residents with hearing loss, and the role that family members play in shared decision making.

History

Table of Contents

Chapter 1. Introduction -- Chapter 2. Narrative literature review -- Chapter 3. Methods -- Chapter 4. Findings: RQ1 medical care - preferences for information and decision making -- Chapter 5. Findings: RQ2 everyday care - preferences for information and decision making -- Chapter 6. Discussion and conclusion.

Notes

Theoretical thesis. Bibliography: pages 81-92

Awarding Institution

Macquarie University

Degree Type

Thesis MRes

Degree

MRes, Macquarie University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Australian Institute of Health Innovation

Department, Centre or School

Australian Institute of Health Innovation

Year of Award

2017

Principal Supervisor

David Greenfield

Rights

Copyright Kristiana Ludlow 2017. Copyright disclaimer: http://mq.edu.au/library/copyright

Language

English

Extent

1 online resource (xv, 113 pages)

Former Identifiers

mq:70159 http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/1260839