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The utilisation of transnational organised crime by Al-Qaeda and the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant

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thesis
posted on 07.09.2022, 02:17 authored by Heather Lockwood

Traditionally, terrorist organisations and organised crime groups have been viewed as two separate entities that diverge in strategic objectives, ideological principles, motives and operational strategy. However, upon examining terrorist organisations which have displayed operational longevity or have made a large-scale global impact, such as Al-Qaeda and the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (IS), it is inferable that an organisation’s involvement in transnational crime has been complementary to their operational and strategic success. This thesis presents a comparative case study analysis of both Al-Qaeda and IS’ utilisation of transnational crime and assesses the extent to which transnational crime has supported these terrorist organisations. The research will be framed as a qualitative study with information sourced through document analysis and online data searching. Preliminary results yielded suggest that transnational organised crime is utilised by Al-Qaeda and IS as an avenue for operational financing, resource acquisition and human-resource acquisition. The specific avenues include; the acquisition and selling of antiquities, kidnapping for ransom, human trafficking and drug trafficking. The discussion presented in this thesis may aid in the development of more comprehensively informed counter-terrorism responses and policy. Furthermore, key operational centres of gravity relating to differing terrorist organisations will be determined.

History

Table of Contents

Chapter one: introduction -- Chapter two: literature review -- Chapter three: transnational organised crimes that have supported and sustained the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant and Al-Qaeda -- Chapter four: the extent to which transnational crimes have supported and sustained the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant and Al-Qaeda -- Chapter five: the impact of differing approaches to transnational crime on the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant as compared to Al-Qaeda -- Chapter six: conclusion -- References

Notes

Submitted on 11/11/2020 in part fulfilment of the Masters of Research Degree

Awarding Institution

Macquarie University

Degree Type

Thesis MRes

Degree

Thesis (MRes), Macquarie University, Department of Security Studies and Criminology, 2020

Department, Centre or School

Department of Security Studies and Criminology

Year of Award

2020

Principal Supervisor

Andrew Tan

Rights

Copyright: The Author Copyright disclaimer: https://www.mq.edu.au/copyright-disclaimer

Language

English

Extent

80 pages