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Western-style diet and its impacts on hippocampal-dependent processes

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thesis
posted on 28.03.2022, 18:35 authored by Tuki Nii Attuquayefio
Based mainly on animal data it has been argued that a Western-style diet impairs hippocampal functions involved in regulating ingestive behaviour – including hippocampal-dependent learning and memory (HDLM), sensitivity to interoceptive signals of hunger and satiety, and the use of such signals to inhibit eating. This thesis has three specific aims, all of which examine whether dietary-induced impairments in animals are evident in humans: (1) To determine if greater consumption of saturated fats and refined sugars (HFS) prevalent in a Western-style diet is associated with impaired hippocampal inhibitory processes for ingestive behaviour; (2) To review any published causal evidence that manipulating energy intake and macronutrient content impacts cognitive function; and (3) To empirically test if an HFS diet causes impairments in hippocampal functions related to ingestive behaviour. Study 1 used a correlational design revealing that greater intake of an HFS diet was associated with poorer HDLM, poorer ability to inhibit wanting (relative to liking) of palatable foods based on physiological state, with the latter being hippocampally-mediated. Study 2 was a systematic review of human experimental studies, revealing that long-term verbal memory tasks were most impacted by changes in energy and fats. Study 3 used an experimental design to show that lean individuals given an HFS diet-intervention for 4 days revealed poorer HDLM and ingestive interoception, relative to a control group. Additionally, greater HDLM impairment was related to larger changes in blood glucose, suggesting one potential pathway by which diet affects the brain. Overall, these findings are consistent with those from animals, providing novel translational findings and the first causal evidence that an HFS diet impairs HDLM

History

Table of Contents

Chapter 1. Introduction -- Chapter 2. The effects of a Western-style diet on hippocampal function -- Chapter 3. A high-fat high-sugar diet predicts poorer hippocampal-related memory and a reduced ability to suppress wanting under satiety -- Chapter 4. A systematic review of longer-term dietary interventions on human cognitive function : emerging patterns and future directions -- Chapter 5. Methodological considerations for longitudinal diet interventions -- Chapter 6. A four-day Western-style dietary intervention causes reductions in hippocampal-dependent learning and memory and interoceptive sensitivity -- Chapter 7. Discussion -- Appendix. | Chapter 1. Introduction -- Chapter 2. The effects of a Western-style diet on hippocampal function -- Chapter 3. A high-fat high-sugar diet predicts poorer hippocampal-related memory and a reduced ability to suppress wanting under satiety -- Chapter 4. A -- Chapter 5. Discussion -- Chapter 6. Conclusion -- Appendices -- References.

Notes

Bibliography: pages 212-232 Thesis by publication.

Awarding Institution

Macquarie University

Degree Type

Thesis PhD

Degree

PhD, Macquarie University, Faculty of Human Sciences, Department of Psychology

Department, Centre or School

Department of Psychology

Year of Award

2018

Principal Supervisor

Richard Stevenson

Rights

Copyright Tuki Nii Attuquayefio 2017. Copyright disclaimer: http://mq.edu.au/library/copyright

Language

English

Extent

1 online resource (330 pages) diagrams, graphs, tables

Former Identifiers

mq:70544 http://hdl.handle.net/1959.14/1265316